Category Archives: Book tips

7 publishing trends to watch for in 2018

Whether you’re already a self-published author or you’re just starting to consider self-publishing, it’s always a good idea to keep your finger on the pulse of the industry. To help you stay in the know, we’ve pulled together some notes on what you can expect to see in the world of book publishing in 2018.

Self-publishing will continue to gain ground on traditional publishing.

Self-publishing thrived in 2017. According to Nielsen Book Senior Director of Research and Analytics Kempton Mooney, for the first time ever, the market share of self-published and indie-published books surpassed the market share of big publishers (42% v. 34%).

According to industry experts, this trend is not going away anytime soon. The number of self-published books is predicted to increase even more in 2018.

Non-fiction books will dominate the market.

In 2017, the dramatic increase of political and social discourse impacted many industries, including publishing. The bestselling books of the year were written by public figures and celebrities like Ta-Nehisi Coates.

For authors, the key takeaway is that people want to read real-life stories. Writers of non-fiction books, biographies, and memoirs should take note and consider moving forward with any project they have on hold.

Video book marketing will make a major impact.

According to Digital Information World, 55% of people watch online videos every day. Because this platform reaches a wide audience, it’s wise for self-published authors to post online videos that promote their books. Popular book videos include trailers, interviews, and sneak-peak reads.

If you would like to create a video but have no idea where to start, the Write Place is happy to help. We can assist you with scripting, recording, editing, and online posting. For an example of our video work, watch the author interview we produced for our 2016 Book Contest winner, Bestow On Us Your Grace.

The demand for kid-friendly nonfiction will also increase.

Like adult nonfiction, the demand for kid-friendly nonfiction is on the rise. Books that educate children about important topics and help them understand the world are being published in greater numbers. Popular topics include science, politics, and historical events.

E-books will continue to be a good investment.

Since 2012, online book sales have exceeded brick-and-mortar sales. This includes purchases of both print and e-books; however, while print books certainly aren’t going away, there are several advantages to publishing an e-book that will continue to be relevant in 2018.

There’s more space on the digital bookshelf than on brick-and-mortar bookshelves. Stores will remove books that aren’t selling from their sales racks. However, e-books are unlikely to be taken down by online retailers, so they have a longer shelf life.

If you have published your book as an e-book and have seen a dip in sales, you should consider investing in a new cover, book description, and marketing campaign. These efforts may give sales a shot in the arm.

Book covers still matter.

Despite the old saying that you shouldn’t judge a book by its cover, people definitely judge books by their covers.

Think of it this way: having a well-designed cover is like picking out the perfect outfit for a first date or a job interview. It needs to be interesting and make a good impression since it’s the first thing that will be noticed. If a book cover is boring or poorly designed, readers are less likely to pick it up to see what it’s about, let alone purchase it.

For example, self-published writer R.L. Mathewson went from selling a handful of copies of her romance novel Playing for Keeps to over a thousand after updating the book’s cover.

The Write Place’s team of professional graphic designers has over a decade of combined experience in creating book covers of all genres. If you’re interested in refreshing your book’s cover design or getting a design for a new project, get in touch!

Editing is still key.

Just as a cover design is crucial to making a good first impression, a well-developed plot, strong mechanics, and interesting dialogue are key to holding readers’ attention and giving them a positive view of your book. Typos, grammatical mistakes, and gaping plot holes can leave a bad taste in a reader’s mouth and make them less likely to recommend your book to others. In fact, they may end up posting a negative review on sites like Amazon and Goodreads.

To ensure your manuscript is as polished as possible, it is always a best practice to work with a professional editor. At the Write Place, we offer three levels of editing services to authors.

Have questions about these trends or our cover design, editing, and book publishing services? Reach out to the Write Place team today!

Thanks to Blurb Blog, Marketing Christian Books, Scholastic Book Club, Flavorwire, HuffPost, and Izzard Ink for the tips, info, and statistics curated for this article.

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10 tips for writing a star manuscript

book-contest-2018

As you may have heard, the Write Place Book Contest will return in 2018!

Every two years, we invite authors across the country to submit their manuscripts to us. Our team of judges reads them and awards one deserving author with free publication of his or her manuscript as a print and e-book.

This time around, we’ll be accepting manuscripts from August 1, 2017-December 15, 2017. Even though that winter deadline may seem far away, it’s always a good idea to get a head start on a writing project. So, to help all you authors out there get started on a new book project or polish an existing one, I’ve put together this list of 10 tips for writing a star manuscript.

Tip #1: Write a book you want to read

As you write, make sure to put yourself in your readers’ shoes. When you read a book, what hooks your attention and entices you to keep reading?

Also, be sure to pick a topic you feel passionately about. As Toni Morrison once said, “If there’s a book that you want to read, but it hasn’t been written yet, then you must write it.” If you love your story, it will shine through and make your writing stronger.

Tip #2: Make a game plan

Before you get started, jot down a brief summary of your book. Keep it short, but be sure you cover the central conflict and its resolution. From there, draft a rough outline of events. Along the way, make note of any particular scenes you want to include. When you’re finished, you’ll have a timeline of events to use as a roadmap for your manuscript.

Tip #3: Lock down your character list

Whether you’re reviewing a complete manuscript or drafting a new one, creating a detailed character list or family tree will help you keep track of who’s who in your story. Be sure to include details like character ages, physical descriptions, relationships, and name spellings. These details are easy to forget or accidentally change. Having a character guide handy will help you guard against those mistakes.

Tip #4: Flex your cartography skills

To keep track of the places your characters visit, sketch out a map of your setting. You’ll get a clearer picture of the world you’ve created, plus you may end up catching errors or inconsistencies.

Tip #5: Establish a writing routine

One of the best ways to stay on track while writing a book is to set a regular writing routine. What time of day do you feel most inspired? Are you a pen-and-paper author, or do you prefer your laptop? What about location? Do you like writing at home, at coffee shops, at the library?

Once you’ve nailed down those details, commit to blocking out a certain amount of time each day or week to devote to your project and stick to it!

Tip #6: Join a writing group

Feedback is a crucial part of the writing process, and local writing groups are a great way to test your book and get live reader feedback. They’re also a great source of inspiration, motivation, and accountability. There are writing groups all across the country. Do a little Google research today to find the one nearest you!

Tip #7: Don’t fear writers’ block

Every author experiences writers’ block, so don’t get discouraged if you find yourself in a slump! Try stepping away from your book for a day or two. Sometimes the best ideas come when you’re doing something other than writing. If that doesn’t work, try talking out the problem with friends, family members, or fellow writers who are familiar with your book. They might just have the key to unlocking the next chapter.

And the absolute best thing about writers’ block? It always passes!

Tip #8: Silence your inner editor

When working on a new manuscript, it can be very tempting to go back and “fix” what you’ve already written. Resist! This will stall your progress and keep you from meeting your deadline. If your inner editor had its way, you would spend hours and hours rewriting what you’ve already done rather than advancing your story.

Remember: your job is to write a finished manuscript. So don’t worry about tweaking your prose or perfecting your dialogue just yet! (That’s what second drafts are for.) Instead, focus on telling the story from beginning to end. Once you’ve done that, feel free to set that inner editor loose!

Tip #9: Read, read, read

William Faulkner once said, “Read, read, read . . . Just like a carpenter who works as an apprentice and studies the master. Read! You’ll absorb it. Then write.” Sometimes, other authors are the best source of inspiration. Get your hands on as many books as you can. Immerse yourself in the genre you’ve chosen to write. Study the conventions of the genre and think about them critically. Discover what you like and dislike. You’ll be a stronger writer for it.

Tip #10: Have fun!

Writing a book is a journey—one that is, admittedly, full of ups and downs. But in the end, there’s no feeling in the world like the sense of accomplishment and pride that comes with putting down your pen or hitting “Save” for the final time. So as you write, make sure you take some time to step back and enjoy the ride!

 

Feeling inspired? I hope so! Remember, the Write Place will begin accepting entries for the 2018 Book Contest on August 1. If you have any questions about the contest, please visit our website or email bookcontest@thewriteplace.biz.

 

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Megalobibliophobia (the fear of large books)

War_and_Peace

Tolstoy’s War & Peace is 1,296 pages long, weighs over 3 pounds, and contains 587,287 words.

Okay, maybe I made up the term “megalobibliophobia.” But the fear of reading large books is very real!

Take for example those “big books” sitting on your shelves at home. You know the ones I’m talking about: 500-plus pages, impressive-looking covers, never-been-cracked spines. In my library, that book is War & Peace. I have every intention of reading it . . . someday. This will be the year, I always promise. And yet there it sits—all 1,296 pages of it—unread.

There’s just something very intimidating about a hefty book. You worry that it’ll take you weeks, months, maybe even a full year to get through it. What if you get bored? What if you don’t understand what’s going on? What if you reach page 700 and forget what happened 300 pages ago? What if your eye begins to wander to the other, shorter books on your shelves? Is all this work even worth your time?

Well, despite my reluctance to take on Tolstoy’s masterpiece, there’s a reason that David Copperfield by Charles Dickens (768 pages) and The Name of the Wind and The Wise Man’s Fear by Patrick Rothfuss (respectively weighing in at 736 and 1,321 pages) hold places of honor on my bookshelf. Daunting as they looked at first glance, these books drew me into their worlds as I read page after page after page. I spent so much time with them that they feel more like dear friends than massive piles of paper, ink, and glue.

So, if there’s a big book in your life you feel intimidated by but you have a sneaking suspicion might be worth the effort, here are a few tips for getting started and staying motivated to read!

Copperfield

My favorite scene from David Copperfield: David “makes himself known” to his Aunt, Betsey Trotwood

Make a schedule

Blocking out 20-30 minutes of reading time a day or setting manageable goals like reading a certain number of pages a week is a great way to tackle a hefty book. I first tried this technique with David Copperfield by setting a goal of reading 100 pages per week. By following that schedule, I knew I could make it to the finish line in less than two months, which was a great motivator. Sticking to it felt a little bit like a chore at first, but by the second or third week I was so engrossed in the story that I exceeded my weekly goal on a few occasions.

Hide the page numbers

If the visual part of reading a long book is putting you off, try using an e-reader. It’s portable, and it takes away the temptation to count exactly how many pages you have to go. Some e-readers even give you the option of turning off the page counter.

Take notes

If the plot of your book is complex and you worry about losing track of characters or important plot points, try making a character list, family tree, or timeline as you read. These tools can help you keep the who, what, when, where, and why of your book straight.

If that sounds too much like homework, try searching online. Sites like SparkNotes can be a great resource for character lists and chapter summaries. If it’s a long book, I guarantee that somebody, somewhere has published a reader’s guide online.

Find a book buddy

Is there someone you know who’s interested in reading the same book? Or perhaps several someones? Creating your own book club is a great way to stay motivated and engaged in reading a long book. You can set goals together and discuss the plot, characters, and what you think is going to happen next. Plus, book club meetings are a great excuse to grab a coffee with your friends!

Take a break

This tip can be dangerous, but if you’re really struggling with a book, try taking a break to read something else. A short break can refresh your brain and renew your motivation. Just be sure to make a commitment to come back to your big book by a certain date if you are truly committed to finishing it.

 

Reading a long book can certainly be an adventure. There may be times when you can’t put it down, and there may be times when you feel tempted to give it up altogether. But no matter what happens on the journey, there is no denying the sense of accomplishment that you’ll feel when you finally reach THE END.

Do you have a big book we should make sure we add to our reading lists? Want to know our team’s favorite big books? Head to our Facebook page!

 


“You can never get a cup of tea large enough or a book long enough to suit me.” – C.S. Lewis


 

P.S. As I was writing this blog post, I realized that a lot of the fears that go along with reading a big book also apply to writing a big book. So, stay tuned for “Megalobibliophobia, Part II (the fear of writing big books)”!

Photo credits:

“War and Peace” – Sarah Elizabeth Altendorf, July 7, 2011, http://www.flickr.com/photos/46732441@N06/5917704508, via http://photopin.com, https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/2.0/, accessed January 9, 2017.

“I make myself known to my Aunt” – Hablot Knight Browne, 1849, http://charlesdickenspage.com/illustrations-david_copperfield.html, accessed January 9, 2017.

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